Recipe: Mojo de Cilantro y Perejil | Venezuelan Cilantro & Parsley Mojo Sauce

17 Jul

This is another type of mojo, like the ones most restaurants have at the table, just like they have salt and pepper.  Personally, I prefer the cilantro and parsley mojo over the mojo isleño.  You can use any mojo as a topping for tostones, hallaquitas, yuca sancochada, yuca frita, parrilla, and empanadas.  You can also use this mojo as a topping for grilled fish, chicken, pork or steaks.

Ingredients Mojo Venezolano

Ingredients Mojo Venezolano

What you need:
– 1 Tbsp. Vegetable Oil
– 1 to 2 Sweet Peppers (Ají Dulce)
– ½ Onion
– ½ Tomato
– ¼ Cup Cilantro Leaves
– ¼ Cup Parsley Leaves
– 1 Tbsp. Wine Vinegar
– 1 Tsp. Salt
– ½ Tsp. Pepper

Preparation:
1.  Do not wash the cilantro or the parsley at first.  Take the leaves and measure out first, not too tightly, and then proceed to wash them. (Note: It doesn’t matter if you use curly parsley or regular parsley)
2. Finely chop all the ingredients.

Finely Chop All Ingredients

Finely Chop All Ingredients

3. In a medium frying pan add the oil and begin to fry the onion and the sweet pepper for about 3 minutes.
4. Add the tomatoes, cilantro and parsley, and continue to fry for about 3 more minutes.  Remove from heat.

Fry All Ingredients

Fry All Ingredients

5. Add the wine vinegar, the salt and the pepper.  Try the mixture and add more salt to taste if necessary.

Mojo de Cilantro y Perejil | Venezuelan Cilantro & Parsley Mojo Sauce

Mojo de Cilantro y Perejil | Venezuelan Cilantro & Parsley Mojo Sauce

6.  Serve as a topping of your favorite recipes, such as fish, potatoes, meats, arepas, boiled yuca or hallaquitas.

Mojo de Cilantro y Perejil | Venezuelan Cilantro & Parsley Mojo Sauce

Mojo de Cilantro y Perejil | Venezuelan Cilantro & Parsley Mojo Sauce

¡Buen Provecho!

2 Responses to “Recipe: Mojo de Cilantro y Perejil | Venezuelan Cilantro & Parsley Mojo Sauce”

  1. David July 17, 2013 at 15:16 #

    There could be some confusion with Ají Dulce and Sweet Peppers. The photo shows what I know as the small Ají Dulce – a product I have never seen in Europe. Whereas to Europeans and most North Americans Sweet Peppers are the big Pimentons available in Venezuela

    • mwolowicz July 17, 2013 at 15:31 #

      David,

      Thank you for visiting the blog, and thank you for your comment. Here in the US, particularly in Florida, I have found that these ‘Mini Sweet Peppers’ produced in florida by PERO Family Farms, are the closest to the Ají Dulce Venezolano that I could find. They do not taste as strong (don’t confuse strong with spicy) as the Venezuelan ají dulce, but it is the closest I have been able to find. Do you know any where else where I might find Ají Dulce Venezolano?

      PERO Family Farms Mini Sweet Peppers Photo

      Here is an interesting article (In Spanish) regarding the variations of Venezuelan Ají Dulce.

      MW

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