Recipe: Venezuelan Tostones

21 Sep

Tostones are one of my favorite ways to eat plantains.   It is also one of the most common ways to eat unripe plantains, and easy to make as well.   Because they use green plantains, the texture of Tostones is dry and hard, and their flavor is salty.   The simplest way to serve these plantains is sprinkled with salt, but you can treat them as appetizers, like little disk-dish for other toppings such as cheese, mojo, salsa, Guasacaca, salads, butter, lemon juice and much more.   Usually they are served as a side dish in other Venezuelan dishes with sprinkled salt on top.   Then as you eat the rest of your shredded beef, rice, black beans, avocado or such, you can use them as a cracker to pick up other main components of your dish.

Ingredients

Ingredients

Ingredients
– 1 unripe/green plantain
– 1½ cups of vegetable oil (enough for frying)
– 1 cup of water
– Garlic Powder (or 2 garlic cloves)
– Salt
– Olive oil
– Tostonera
– Bowl

Tostonera

Tostonera

Preparation

1. Add the oil to a small frying pan and heat it up on high temperature.
2. Mix the salt and garlic with the cup of water in a bowl, to create salty and garlicky water.
3. First cut the top and bottom of the plantain, just the tip.   Then cut a slit from top to bottom through the skin, until you touch the pulp.   Use a little bit of olive oil on your hands to separate the pulp from the skin, so that you avoid the pulp from blackening quickly.

Cut Tips and Slit

Cut Tips and Slit

Remove Skin

Remove Skin

4. Now cut the entire plantain in rounds of about half an inch each.

Cut In Circles

Cut In Circles

5. Fry the plantain rounds about 2 minutes on one side.   Then turn and continue frying another 2 minutes on the other side.

Fry

Fry

Turn

Turn

6. Carefully remove the plantain from the pan and lay them on top of some paper towels to soak up the excess oil. Do not turn off the stove just yet.

Lay on Paper Towels

Lay on Paper Towels

7. Now you will flatten the rounds in to the famous “Tostones” shape.   You can do this easily with a “Tostonera”, which is simply a wooden press created specifically to make Tostones.   But if you don’t have one, you can use a mallet or the bottom of a plate.   Make sure you don’t press too hard or the tostón will break.   Leave them at about ¼ of an inch thick.

Flatten Plantain Rounds with Tostonera to form Tostones

Flatten Plantain Rounds with Tostonera to form Tostones

Repeat with each plantain round

Repeat with each plantain round

8. Dip each tostón in the salty/garlicky water mixture and then place them back in the pan to fry them a bit more.

Dip in Salt/Garlic Water

Dip in Salt/Garlic Water

9. Once golden take them out and lay them again on paper towels to soak up the excess oil.

Fry a second time and remove excess oil with paper towels again

Fry a second time and remove excess oil with paper towels again

10. Sprinkle with salt and serve.

Serve Hot & Sprinkle with Salt

Serve Hot & Sprinkle with Salt

* 1 plantain makes about 10 Tostones (depending on how long the plantain is and on how thick you slice it).

Venezuelan Tostones

Venezuelan Tostones

Venezuelan Tostones

Venezuelan Tostones

¡Buen Provecho!

6 Responses to “Recipe: Venezuelan Tostones”

  1. melodigrundy October 13, 2012 at 06:51 #

    In the 1970’s when I was in Venezuela I leaned to “smash” these with the bottom of a strong glass tumbler or coffee cup. Some people used spoons, but I find the glass works best – I never saw one of these, but then I never saw an arapa cooker either.

    • mwolowicz October 18, 2012 at 18:07 #

      Melodigrundy,

      Thank you for your comment. Yes, it is amazing how technology makes us all lazy. Arepas used to take longer to cook, and now with a TostiArepa it only takes about 7 minutes. But some people still prefer the original cooking method.

      MW

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Cool Tool Thursday « Venezuelan Cooking - November 3, 2011

    […] can find some other use for it.   However, this Venezuelan cooking tool or utensil is perfect for making Venezuelan Tostones.   All you have to do is place the plantain slices in the pre-cut whole inside the Tostonera, and […]

  2. Recipe: Mojo de Cilantro y Perejil | Venezuelan Cilantro Parsley Mojo Sauce | asky Cooking - December 22, 2014

    […] prefer the cilantro and parsley mojo over the mojo isleño.  You can use any mojo as a topping for tostones, hallaquitas, yuca sancochada, yuca frita, parrilla, and empanadas.  You can also use this mojo as […]

  3. Wood Working and Plantains | SawDust Sisters - June 18, 2015

    […] is (just use a spoon a get some from the skillet) and a little bit on the lid, then smash away: source Remove the toston with a fork and throw back in the oil. Continue with the same process until […]

  4. Wood Working and Plantains - Sawdust Sisters - May 24, 2016

    […] is (just use a spoon a get some from the skillet) and a little bit on the lid, then smash away: source Remove the toston with a fork and throw back in the oil. Continue with the same process until […]

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