Recipe: Venezuelan Hallaquitas or Bollitos

28 Dec

One of the most delicious side dishes in Venezuela are hallaquitas, or bollitos.  The name is still debatable.  Some people call them hallaquitas and some call them bollitos.  Either way they are delicious.  We usually serve them as a side dish, much like you would a baked potato, and then add some butter on top, or Guasacaca and enjoy.  This is a very common side dish to have with a good Parrilla Venezolana (Venezuelan Grilled Steak, much like your BBQs, but without BBQ sauce).  Another great dish to have hallaquitas with is rotisserie chicken.  Since we also accompany these dishes with Guasacaca, hallaquitas are the perfect side dish for those occasions.  They are also great if you incorporate other ingredients such as pork rind, chorizo or cheese inside them.  But the plain ones are great with some butter, Guasacaca, mojo isleño, mojo de cilantro, or chimichurri on top.

Ingredients

Ingredients

What you need:
- 8 to 10 Dried Corn Husks
– 1 Cup Harina P.A.N.
– ¾ Cup Water (for mixture)
– 1 Tablespoon Butter
– 1Teaspoon Salt
– ¼ Cup or 250 g. Chorizo, one link (optional)
– 5 Cups Water (for boiling)

Preparation:

1. Separate and clean the corn husks, then soak them in water for about 1 hour so they can be bent without breaking.  If you don’t have one hour to spare, you can just pre-boil them for about 5 minutes so they can be bent easily.

Separate and clean the corn husks

Separate and clean the corn husks

Soak for 1 hour

Soak for 1 hour

Or boil for 5 minutes

Or boil for 5 minutes

2. In a bowl mix in the Harina P.A.N., the ¾ Cup of water, the salt and the butter (softened or melted).

Prepare dough

Prepare dough

3. Once you have kneaded the mixture and it becomes homogeneous you can begin forming the hallaquitas.

Form Hallaquitas

Form Hallaquitas

4. Grab a handful of the dough (or separate in 4 equal parts), and roll it in your hands to form a cylindrical shape. (Here is where you can add chopped chorizo, cheese, pork rind, etc.).

Add optional chorizo, cheese, etc.

Add optional chorizo, cheese, etc.

5. Wrap each hallaquita with 2 or 3 corn husks so that the dough is well covered.  You can accomplish this by wrapping them on the widest side of the corn husk, and then folding down the rest of the corn husk on top of the hallaquita and tie it down either with another piece of corn husk, or with a rubber band right down the middle, and if you need to, you can add another rubber band or tie at the end.

Wrap with 1st corn husk

Wrap with 1st corn husk

Wrap with 2nd corn husk

Wrap with 2nd corn husk

Fold top

Fold top

Fold bottom

Fold bottom

Tie around center with rubber band

Tie around center with rubber band

Use two rubber bands if needed

Use two rubber bands if needed

6. Begin to boil enough water, and when it starts to boil add the hallaquitas.  Cook for 40 minutes on high heat.  You are supposed to know they are ready when they start to float, however mine floated as soon as I introduced them in the water.  So to be safe, just wait the 40 minutes.

Boil for 40 minutes

Boil for 40 minutes

7. Remove from pot and drain for about 3 minutes, and serve hot.  You can serve them with the corn husk, or without.

Drain and let cool

Drain and let cool

8. Serve as a side with butter, or chimichurri, or Guasacaca, or anything else you like.

Serve with husk

Serve with husk

Or without husk

Or without husk

Venezuelan Hallaquitas or Bollitos

Venezuelan Hallaquitas or Bollitos

*Makes about 4 to 5 hallaquitas.

¡Buen Provecho!

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3 Responses to “Recipe: Venezuelan Hallaquitas or Bollitos”

  1. Marjorie Diez September 4, 2012 at 11:46 #

    Thank you for this blog! As a Venezuelan, is a pleasure to find these wonderful reminders of our day-to-day cuisine, simply delicious and creative. Just one thing I would like to add: In my family hallaquitas and bollitos are diferent. Hallaquitas would be those in this recipe, while ‘bollitos’ is the same corn dough -without- the corn husks. It’s very handy at the table, and yes, they can also be filled with some ‘carne con salsa’ (bollos pelones). They’ll be ready fast, putting them in enough boiling water, and they will go up when done.
    Hallaquitas instead, have the advantage of being ‘done’ and stay like that longer :-)…and it’s not a bad idea to slice them and fry them slightly in a little butter…add some cheese and you’re done :-) Thanks again!

    • mwolowicz September 15, 2012 at 20:41 #

      Marjorie,

      Thank you so much for your comment. I am a little confused by your Hallaquitas vs. Bollitos description. Is is possible that you could provide an image link to clarify my confusion? Thank you!

      MW

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. “Parrillas”, aka grill-outs [Venezuelan style] | Vanessa C. Marcano-Kelly - August 12, 2014

    […] of steak, chorizo and morcilla (blood sausage), chicken, all garnished with tangy, fresh guasacaca, hallaquitas made of white corn meal, melt-in-your-mouth boiled yuca, and salad (though I always stayed away from […]

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